Center for Economic and Policy Research

For The Revolving Door Project

Overview
The Revolving Door Project, a fiscally sponsored project of Center for Economic and Policy Research, focuses on the executive branch to ensure officeholders serve the public interest, rather than work to entrench corporate power or seek personal advancement. The project educates civil society to counteract the advantage that the financial sector and corporate America have in the regulatory process.
About the Grantee
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cepr.net 
Address
1611 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC, 20009, United States
Grants to this Grantee
for the Revolving Door Project  
The Revolving Door Project, a fiscally sponsored project of Center for Economic and Policy Research, focuses on the executive branch to ensure officeholders serve the public interest, rather than work to entrench corporate power or seek personal advancement. The project educates civil society to counteract the advantage that the financial sector and corporate America have in the regulatory process.
for general operating support  
The Center for Economic and Policy Research is a think tank established in 1999 to promote democratic debate on the most important economic and social issues that affect people’s lives. For over two decades the center has used data-driven research to challenge assumptions and identify problems emerging from the neoliberal status quo, promoting informed debate on the social and economic trends that define our society and helping develop a new “common sense” about how the economy works. Its research offers a new framework for how we think about wealth inequality, public investment, and worker empowerment, while documenting how the rules governing markets have contributed enormously to the rise in inequality and the ways in which the system is rigged. The center works to offer policy solutions to level the playing field.
for the Revolving Door Project  
The Revolving Door Project scrutinizes the executive branch to ensure officeholders serve the public interest, rather than work to entrench corporate power or seek personal advancement. Many of the rules governing our economy are written by the executive branch outside the purview of civil society. And many of that branch’s most consequential decisions relate to the enforcement (or not) of longstanding legal limits on corporate power. The project educates civil society to counteract the advantage that Wall Street and corporate America have in this opaque process. Only with progressive scrutiny will the executive branch write and enforce rules that shift the economy away from rent extraction and toward greater economic equality.

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